Phase and Flair

Phase is commonly used to mean a period or stage. Phase comes from “phasis” (Latin), which means “to bring light or to show” (that’s why the moon has phases). So, the phase of Lavoce’s ascension is a time of phasis; it is a time when we show the world that identity is not a phase and that we are unfazed by those who think it is.

Eventually, Lavoce will have employees who go out into the world in mainstream clothing with a bit of flair (e.g., rainbow highlight, nose ring, black nail polish). The extremely dressed employees will stay within the store locations as we want a gradual transition for the public. Flair comes from “scent” (Old French). It can describe a unique style or can mean natural talent. So, the external consultants who go out in the world with a bit of flair will show employers that they have missed out on a  large segment of the American workforce who have a flair for good, solid job skills.

In Eruption: Hitherto Unpublished Pages About Men and Events, Mark Twain says, “Sane and intelligent human beings…carefully and cautiously and diligently conceal their private real opinions from the world and give out fictitious ones in their stead for general consumption.” What this means is that most of what we hear in society is a lie. Sometimes it is a blatant, intentional lie, and sometimes it is a lie “for general consumption” for the purposes of protecting oneself. If you are sick and tired of lies and lying, join with me to express your true feelings through words, actions, and “behaviors” the term employers use to cover deviations from their appearance policy. If employers think that showing the world your true self is bad behavior, that’s their problem (but it’s also yours, and that’s why we want things to change). As one of my favorite poets, Ralph Waldo Emerson, says in “Social Aims” (1875), “What you are stands over you the while, and thunders so that I cannot hear what you say.”

Advertisements

One thought on “Phase and Flair

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s